Helping introverts be successful on their own terms.

 

Jobs for introverts who aren’t very social

Dear introverts: we can flourish in any job. Seriously.

However, some jobs are more draining than others. I’ve spent several years in retail, and several other years as a receptionist/secretary. Both of these positions were draining, but I was able to fit in enough downtime to make the job work out.

When deciding on a career think about how the job will affect your energy levels, and if you expect to have enough downtime afterwards to recuperate. Also, think about whether you need a job that’s aligned with your passions, or whether you can fulfill your passions and interests outside of work. Does the job work with your strengths, like math, writing, or working with your hands? Or, would you be spending a lot of time compensating for your weaknesses?

If you’ve decided that you’d like a job that requires little social interaction, I have a list of ideas for you:

    • Driver (delivery, long-haul, etc.)
    • Mail Carrier
    • Animal Care (dog walker, pet sitter, etc.)
    • Paralegal
    • Accountant/Bookkeeper/Auditor
    • Computers (software developer, web developer, programmer, etc.)
    • Data Entry
    • Transcription (legal, medical, etc.)
    • Technician (medical, lab, etc.)
    • Repairs (auto, electrical, industrial machine, etc.)
    • Conservator/Archivist
    • Social Media Manager
    • Blogger
    • Film editor
    • Artist
    • Actor
    • Musician
    • Graphic Design
    • Writer (freelance, proofreader, technical, etc.)
    • Air Traffic Controller
    • 911 Dispatcher

If you have any other career ideas, please share them in the comments section.

Take Back Your Downtime eCourse is about to start

Sorry, but this class has already started. The next Take Back Your Downtime class starts on March 2nd!

If you’d like to be informed when the next course is open for registration, please fill in the form below:

If you’re overwhelmed and feel like you have no time for yourself, this is the course for you!

 

The Facts

Who: Introverts who need more downtime
What: Three weeks of emailed prompts, tools, and knowledge
Where: Online, through daily (weekday) emails
When: Starts March 2nd, registration opens in mid-January!
Cost: $35
And: You get access to a private Facebook group with others who are taking the course. I’m also available by email if you have any questions.

 

Class Breakdown
  • Week one: Week one starts off with looking at our priorities and goals. We then track how we spend our time. Previous students have found this very useful because it allows us to objectively see how we currently spend our time versus the way we want to spend our time. Once we know what the problem is, we can start to change it.
  • Weeks two and three: We’ll discuss productivity tips and tools, and how to apply them to what you found in week 1. We’ll also look at time-sucking habits and what you can do to diminish that time, or make the most of that time.

All emails will have a task for you to complete, and at the start of each week you’ll receive a worksheet to keep all of your answers in one place. Weekday emails should take no more than 30 minutes of your time.

It’s possible that not every task or prompt will apply to your situation, so you’ll also get a list of 15 optional extra tasks.

Click here for more information.

Registration opens in mid-January!

2015 – prediction about the introvert community

What will happen in 2015? No one know for certain, of course (except maybe that the universe will continue to expand). But I won’t let that stop me from making some guesses about what the next year (and beyond) will look like for the introvert community as a whole.

2015 will bring us some interesting research studies on introversion and extraversion. There will be lots more talk about the Big Five, particularly the theorized facets of introversion and extraversion.

With a little help from the petition that Introvert Dear and I are running, the term introvert will become less synonymous with the term shy. Introverts and Extroverts who are shy, highly sensitive, or have social anxiety will be able to learn a lot more about themselves. We may also see the very beginnings of an “ambivert revolution.” Whether this will be the case or not, it’s possible there will be fewer listicles about introversion than the past two years, and more listicles about shy extroverts and ambiverts.

We’ll also see a lot more products and services produced directly for introverts. We may even start to see these isolation pods in the office or public spaces.introvert-pod

Although there will continue to be “Hi, my name is ___ and I’m an introvert” articles written, I think 2015 will see a growth of articles talking about the specific issues, and corresponding solutions, that many introverts are faced with. Hopefully this means more in-depth articles.

One of my big worries for 2015 is that as people continue to become more engrossed in their electronic devices we’ll start to see a greater divide between the generations, and about how the younger generations are spending more time in front of their devices and not in front of their friends. I don’t know how it will all play out in the end, but it may be that non-social introverts will be caught in the middle, and we’ll see the continued pathologizing of people who don’t socialize as much as “they should.”

As far as Introvertology is concerned, I hope to bring you more classes in 2015, more in-depth articles, and more collaborations with other introvert thought leaders.

Onwards!

(now where can I buy one of those isolation pods…)

A brief 2014 introvert year in review

On the face of it, 2014 wasn’t a “huge” year for introverts. It wasn’t nearly as groundbreaking as 2012, when Susan Cain published her book Quiet and gave her now-famous TED talk. Or as viral as 2003, when Jonathan Rauch posted his essay “Caring for Your Introvert” in The Atlantic. But during 2014, introverts were still making some quiet noise.

In 2014 Introvertology’s website was launched. 2014 also saw the birth of “The first online magazine for introverts and highly sensitive people,” and “The First Travel Experience for Introverts by Introverts,” and so many new introvert-focused blogs and websites popped up that I lost count.

The introvert listicles kept coming throughout 2014. Although they still seem to be popular, they’re also starting to annoy a lot of people, and have spawned a few satirical articles.

2014 also saw the launch of Quiet Spaces, a line of office space solutions for introverts.

Introvert Dear and I stirred things up a bit towards the end of the year, by starting a petition to change the dictionary definition of introvert from shy (you can find the petition below).

2014 seems to have been a year when introvert thought leaders started focusing a little more on the needs of the introvert community, and a little less on getting the word out that introverts exist. I think we’re going to look back in a few years and see 2014 as a year of transitions.

Look for a post tomorrow about what I think 2015 will bring! And I’d love to hear what you think about 2014 in the comments section.

Introvert Redefined

Sign this petition to ask Google, Dictionary.com, Oxford Dictionary, and Cambridge Online Dictionaries to change their definitions of the word "introvert."

Google defines an introvert as someone who is “a shy, reticent person; a person predominantly concerned with their own thoughts and feelings rather than with external things."

Cambridge Online Dictionaries defines an introvert as "someone who is shy, quiet, and unable to make friends easily."

Not only are these definitions hurtful, but they're also inaccurate.
We'd like Google and others to change their definition to:

"An introvert is someone who has a preference for minimally stimulating environments, due to a difference in the way sensory input is processed in the introvert's brain."

[signature]

168 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   

 

Spread the word:

I’ve helped fix the myth that introversion = shyness! Here’s how to add your voice: http://introvertology.com/500-petition-signatures (click to tweet)

500 Petition Signatures!

Update 1/18:
We have over 900 signatures now!

One week ago Jenn, from Introvert Dear, and I started collecting signatures to tell four dictionaries — Google, Dictionary.com, Oxford Dictionary, and Cambridge Online Dictionary — that their definition of “introvert” is incorrect.

Between the petitions found on both sites we’ve reached 500 signatures!

Join…
Laurie Helgoe, author of Introvert Power
Sophia Dembling, author of The Introvert’s Way
Nancy Ancowitz, author of Self-Promotion for Introverts
Rachel Tucker, filmmaker/creator of Introverts Web Series
Brenda Knowles, creator of the space2live.net blog
Lisa Avebury, creator of Sacred Introvert
Val Nelson, a work & life coach for introverts
Kathryn Hall, creator of thebusinessofintroverts.co.uk
Andy Mort, creator of Sheep Dressed Like Wolves
Tanja Gardner, creator of Conscious Introvert Success
Catherine Callender, who runs Quietly Authentic
and Michaela Chung, who runs Introvert Spring
in signing a petition telling 4 dictionaries to stop defining an introvert as a shy person.

Introvert Redefined

Sign this petition to ask Google, Dictionary.com, Oxford Dictionary, and Cambridge Online Dictionaries to change their definitions of the word "introvert."

Google defines an introvert as someone who is “a shy, reticent person; a person predominantly concerned with their own thoughts and feelings rather than with external things."

Cambridge Online Dictionaries defines an introvert as "someone who is shy, quiet, and unable to make friends easily."

Not only are these definitions hurtful, but they're also inaccurate.
We'd like Google and others to change their definition to:

"An introvert is someone who has a preference for minimally stimulating environments, due to a difference in the way sensory input is processed in the introvert's brain."

[signature]

168 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   


(petition not working? You can also sign the petition at Introvert Dear’s site.)

Here Google’s definition of introvert:
“noun:
1. a shy, reticent person.”

Ummm, No. Sorry Google, but you’re providing your users with incorrect information.

Here’s the definition we suggest:
“An introvert is someone who has a preference for minimally stimulating environments, due to a difference in the way sensory input is processed in the introvert’s brain.”

Why I’m doing this:
When I was growing up the closest words I had to describe myself were shy and weird. Although those words were an accurate description of how I often felt and behaved, neither of those labels were very useful to my understanding of myself. Learning the word introvert though has had a huge impact on my life. Such a big impact that last year I decided to make introversion – the study of it, and the helping of fellow introverts – my career! But this was only possible because I was able to learn that the word introvert IS NOT a synonym for a shy person.

I know there’s introverts out there who are struggling to figure out why they behave different from some of their friends and family, and all they have is the word shy, a word they may feel doesn’t describe them. That’s why I’ve started this petition.

Spread the word:

I’ve helped fix the myth that introversion = shyness! Here’s how to add your voice: http://introvertology.com/500-petition-signatures (click to tweet)

Introvert Redefined

Sign this petition to ask Google, Dictionary.com, Oxford Dictionary, and Cambridge Online Dictionaries to change their definitions of the word "introvert."

Google defines an introvert as someone who is “a shy, reticent person; a person predominantly concerned with their own thoughts and feelings rather than with external things."

Cambridge Online Dictionaries defines an introvert as "someone who is shy, quiet, and unable to make friends easily."

Not only are these definitions hurtful, but they're also inaccurate.
We'd like Google and others to change their definition to:

"An introvert is someone who has a preference for minimally stimulating environments, due to a difference in the way sensory input is processed in the introvert's brain."

[signature]

168 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   

Latest Signatures
168Lisa HarrisJan 26, 2015
167Lana PhillipsJan 12, 2015
166Joseph Merced Jan 11, 2015
165Phillip RichardJan 10, 2015
164Tim CookJan 04, 2015
163Antoinette KouJan 03, 2015
162Samuel ArnoldJan 03, 2015
161Chris SaggersonJan 03, 2015
160Lauren CattJan 03, 2015
159rois diazJan 03, 2015
158Richard ZhuangJan 03, 2015
157Alissa ReddittJan 03, 2015
156danele gusseJan 03, 2015
155Laura VazquezJan 03, 2015
154LISA BARTLETTJan 03, 2015
153Richard LopezJan 03, 2015
152Reilly AndersonJan 03, 2015
151Sjon QuinnJan 03, 2015
150Molly PearsonJan 03, 2015
149Jesse ramirezJan 03, 2015
148Joel CastagnerJan 03, 2015
147Zach lopezJan 03, 2015
146Melissa HodgesJan 03, 2015
145Selena johnsonJan 03, 2015
144Grahm LarkhamJan 02, 2015
143Rahat SharifJan 02, 2015
142Amelia KardsonJan 02, 2015
141Jessica SpruitJan 02, 2015
140Ariel LawsonJan 02, 2015
139Thomas ShippyJan 02, 2015
138Ellen McAlexanderJan 02, 2015
137Calvin MacJan 02, 2015
136Jake TomichJan 02, 2015
135Glenn HodgsonJan 02, 2015
134Alejandra RodriguezJan 02, 2015
133Jeff SandefurJan 02, 2015
132Jing ChaiJan 02, 2015
131Heather kingJan 02, 2015
130Z shockleyJan 02, 2015
129Amariah LemJan 02, 2015
128Blake SchlotzhauerJan 02, 2015
127Jake DennisonJan 02, 2015
126Aaron GuthrieJan 02, 2015
125Nick JanischJan 02, 2015
124Jack GardnerJan 02, 2015
123Manix RockJan 02, 2015
122Megan GeringJan 02, 2015
121Jenny ManJan 02, 2015
120Nate SmithJan 02, 2015
119Daniel KnightJan 02, 2015

 

p.s. I’m doing this for shy extroverts too!

Copyright © 2014. Introvertology.